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  • How long will we survival TC

    Hey guys, I just finished my chemo which is a shot of carboplatin, I actually don't know how well it works as they suspect some lymph nodes are enlarged to 7mm. I stay with here for a while and glad to see my people have all clear report for many years. But there still a worry in my mind which is how long on earth do people usually survival from Testicular cancer? 20 years? 30 or more just like a normal people? I might be stupid to raise this question, anyway, I am appreciated if anyone give me any idea about it. thanks.
    15/05/10 - Found lump on lefttesticle
    09/06/10 - Left I/O
    06/10 - 100% Classic Seminoma
    14/07/10 - Adjuvant carboplatin
    10/07/11 - First Year All Clear
    15/07-12 - 2nd Year All Clear

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Don't always look back, the future is in front.

  • #2
    my uncle had a cancer not TC but when he hit his 5 yr mark hes doc told him hes chances of getting cancer again was that of the rest of the world. that being said once cure is reached you should live as long as you are ment to be on this earth and im sure that will be a long heathly life and for every year you live thats one more year the good doctors helping us have to understanding this nasty crap that we have had to deal with and come up with new treatments to assure a long life. TC puts heavy thoughts in your head I have been dealing with my own thoughts as I wait to hear whats next. but in the end they are nothing more then mind game that need to be over come with time.
    Brian

    3/29/10 went to ER pain and swelling in testie
    4/07/10 found out about tc
    4/12/10 L i/o 1.3x1.3x1.9 teratoma, chorio
    5/3/10 start 3x BEP
    5/24/10 switch to 4xep off bleo do to lung clots
    7/9/10 end of chemo
    1/1/11 off the blood thinners
    10/11 year and 3 months clear

    Comment


    • #3
      If the treatment cures you, which is noramally the case. You will probably die of any other thing aside of testicular cancer, I've read from internet or know personally (one of my uncle) who are long term survivors of testicular cancers: more than 30 years.

      So dont stress yourself too much over this issue, no one can tell what is going to happen in the future, but certainly its not hard to be a long term testicular cancer survivor.

      Comment


      • #4
        I survived long enough to get a second TC 35 years after my first one. Looks like I'm surviving that one pretty well so far also.

        Dave
        Jan, 1975: Right I/O, followed by RPLND
        Dec, 2009: Left I/O, followed by 3xBEP

        Comment


        • #5
          How long will we live? I don't think anybody knows. My oncologist is fond of saying that once we get beyond the first year of any kind of treatment, chances are hugely higher that a TC survivor will succumb to something other than TC.She says the same thing about prostate cancer, which we all need to be concerned about as we age.That doesn't really answer the question, though.

          The TC community is very small relative to the populations afflicted by other cancers, so it's difficult to find studies with enough of a sample to be statisticly significant. Most large studies focus on the effects (morbidity) of chemo, radiation, and surgery. If you dig deep enough, you will find statistics that indicate that cancer survivors in general have slightly to moderately elevated risk of luekemia from chemo, secondary cancers and cardio vascular damage from radiation, and cancers from CT and xray dosing. But many of those studies are based on much higher doses of chemo and radiation used against more stubborn cancers.

          We probably won't have a clear picture of the morbidity of TC for a few more decades. Realize that the survivability of TC jumped from 5% to 95% from the mid-1970's to the 1990's due to better diagnosis and refined treatment. Early pioneers like Dave (Davepet) are accumulating longevity (35 years) but the average TC survivor probably has somewhere around 20 years. The good-great news is that the average is increasing every year.

          While no one can really answer the question, I think we have a lot of longevity ahead of us. It never hurts to take better care of ourselves and seek medical advice at the first sign that something isn't right. Message received. Loud and clear. Lessons learned.

          Back to my oncologist at Dana Farber, she is convinced that cardiovascular disease will by far overtake cancer as the leading cause of death in the US. And the major cause of CV disease? Childhood obesity.
          "Statistics are human beings with the tears wiped off" - Paul Brodeur
          Diagnosis: 05Sept07 Right I/O: 13Sept07; Pure Seminoma; Surveillance only per NCCN: All Clear August2013 (CT scan, Markers)

          Comment


          • #6
            Jeff

            Live you life and look forward to the future. There are lots of other things that could go wrong like any one else and then you easily live to 100+

            Cheers

            Kiwi
            >>>>>>>>>
            TC1: May 2001 / Right orchiectomy / seminoma stage 1 / Radiation
            TC2: July 2008 / Left orchiectomy / seminoma stage 1 / X2 Prostheses / Reandron (long term Testosterone injections)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Kiwi View Post
              Jeff

              Live you life and look forward to the future. There are lots of other things that could go wrong like any one else and then you easily live to 100+

              Cheers

              Kiwi
              Thanks Kiwi. :-)
              15/05/10 - Found lump on lefttesticle
              09/06/10 - Left I/O
              06/10 - 100% Classic Seminoma
              14/07/10 - Adjuvant carboplatin
              10/07/11 - First Year All Clear
              15/07-12 - 2nd Year All Clear

              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Don't always look back, the future is in front.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm currently 20 years out of treatment and I have no plans of departing any time soon. No one is guaranteed any set number of years. I consider my chances of survival the same as any other person, cancer or no cancer. Let's see I’m 38 now and I think it is reasonable that I have another 38 years to go. Maybe more.
                If you look for the truth outside yourself, it gets farther and farther away. ~ Tung-Shan
                If you love life, don't waste time, for time is what life is made up of. ~ Bruce Lee
                Please sponsor me for the 2011 LiveSTRONG Challenge Philadelphia.
                My Blog

                Diagonosed 1988. Left I/O - 3 rounds of chemo
                Relasped 1989. RPLND - 3 rounds HDC - Bone Marrow transplant.
                There is Army Strong, There is Live Strong and then there is me. Crazy Strong

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul54 View Post
                  Back to my oncologist at Dana Farber, she is convinced that cardiovascular disease will by far overtake cancer as the leading cause of death in the US. And the major cause of CV disease? Childhood obesity.
                  Hmmm, I was under the impression that cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death for decades, if not longer....
                  Jan, 1975: Right I/O, followed by RPLND
                  Dec, 2009: Left I/O, followed by 3xBEP

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul54 View Post
                    We probably won't have a clear picture of the morbidity of TC for a few more decades. Realize that the survivability of TC jumped from 5% to 95% from the mid-1970's to the 1990's due to better diagnosis and refined treatment. Early pioneers like Dave (Davepet) are accumulating longevity (35 years) but the average TC survivor probably has somewhere around 20 years. The good-great news is that the average is increasing every year.
                    Yes, I have yet to run into a TC survivor with more than 35 years. Realize that we are talking about 1975. BEP either wasn't available at all or was experimental. I was lucky mine got treated before it spread. It seems most of the TC patients from back then are no longer with us. I doubt anyone could find the statistics to tell us what they died from, but if not treated early, TC was pretty much a death sentence back then.

                    What I am wondering about is: now that most of us are surviving out first primary TC, how many more will get a second? I hate to bring this negative thought up, but there really aren't any statistics to predict this yet. I'm not trying to scare anyone, but the often repeated mantra that "if you had it once the chances of getting it again are very small" just doesn't have enough years of modern first primary treatment behind it to be taken as gospel truth.

                    Don't let up on your surveillance, guys. I'm living proof that it can hit you again many years after you thought is was part of ancient history.

                    Dave
                    Jan, 1975: Right I/O, followed by RPLND
                    Dec, 2009: Left I/O, followed by 3xBEP

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dave,

                      Great to see that you are a long term survivor. This is an extract from the UK NHS pages on TC:
                      Even if your cancer has been completely cured, there is a risk that it will later return. Around 25-30% of people will experience a return of the cancer, usually within the first two years after their treatment has finished.

                      Due to this risk, you will require regular tests to check whether the cancer has returned. These tests include:
                      •a physical examination
                      •blood tests
                      •chest X-ray
                      •computerised tomography (CT) scan
                      Testing is usually recommended every three months during the first year after treatment. After the first year, the tests will be less frequent, decreasing to twice a year, and then annually.

                      If the cancer does return and is diagnosed at an early stage, it will usually be possible to cure it using radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some types of recurring testicular cancer have a cure rate of almost 100%.
                      As the above states, keep the surveillance going. My mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in the early 1960's and she survived a further 30 years, albeit with several recurrences.
                      Jon
                      Left orchiectomy May 2008, AFP 1600, βHCG 200and normal after 5 months (AFP4, βHCG<1)
                      Non-Seminoma stage 1 - Under surveillance
                      3 years on and still all clear

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If it makes you feel any better since diagnosis three people I know closely have told me they has TC 10+ years ago, including a close friends dad.
                        All OK now.
                        Right side larger and harder then left 9/5/10
                        Ultrasound right sided mass 12/5/10
                        Right I/O 13/5/10
                        3.5 cm seminoma with invasion of lymphatics / rete testis.
                        Oncology 7/6/10
                        1x Carboplatin 10/6/10
                        Chest X Ray / Markers 21/1/11 Clear
                        CT 1/7/11 Clear

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Davepet View Post
                          I survived long enough to get a second TC 35 years after my first one. Looks like I'm surviving that one pretty well so far also.

                          Dave
                          Dave, That's really glad to see you are a long term survivor, you give us confidence. I am just wondering during the term, do you have any trouble have to deal with after the treatment?
                          15/05/10 - Found lump on lefttesticle
                          09/06/10 - Left I/O
                          06/10 - 100% Classic Seminoma
                          14/07/10 - Adjuvant carboplatin
                          10/07/11 - First Year All Clear
                          15/07-12 - 2nd Year All Clear

                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Don't always look back, the future is in front.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I always try to put a positive spin on everything, stupid personality of mine. The way I look at it is we actually have a *higher* survival rate than normal, because for so long after we get regular checkups and it gets *detected* early. There is no way its going to sneak back up on us. Not like my grandmother who died of bowel cancer, or my auntie who had breast/lymph cancer and then leukemia (diagnosed with 3 months to live, and lived 5 years!).

                            My mother had pre-cancerous cells removed about 8 years ago. As most women should, she gets checked out yearly for followups. This year they detected a very aggressive but early stage cancer (with HER2). If she hadn't gone through previous issues, been made aware, and been vigilant she would probably not be around much longer. Instead she went through chemo/radiation and is now cancer free.

                            Ok, end of my rant
                            Initial diagnoses: Elevated hCG, Left I/O 17-June-2010. Prosthetic implant.
                            Pathology: Stage 1b, Seminoma/Teratoma
                            Treatment: Surveillance. hCG normalised 07/10
                            Relapse: Elevated hCG. 3xBEP finished 24/01/2011

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jeffsonxl View Post
                              Dave, That's really glad to see you are a long term survivor, you give us confidence. I am just wondering during the term, do you have any trouble have to deal with after the treatment?
                              After my RPLND in 1975, I had bowel obstructions on two occasions within the next 10 years.These required surgery to fix. Chemo wasn't even offered an option back then.I recall reading that the BEP regime was developed just 25 years ago.

                              Dave
                              Jan, 1975: Right I/O, followed by RPLND
                              Dec, 2009: Left I/O, followed by 3xBEP

                              Comment

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