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How long will we survival TC

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  • #16
    I just want to throw in an additional thought here. It is true that with more primary survivors, there will be more secondary cancers. Not too many people used to live long enough to get a thirty-five year relapse. However, it's also worth considering where treatments will be in twenty or thirty years. Things have come along way in recent decades. I suspect if this cure buys you another twenty years or so, you'll be in very good hands when the relapse does occur.
    I know I fully intend to die of something more interesting than this stupid TC.
    Right I/O 4/'10 Stage I B
    80% embryonal 20% classic seminoma
    CT Scan 5/'10 showed mets in abdomen and lung
    Restaged to III A
    4xEP 5/'10 - 7/'10
    CT Scan 7/'10 Normal
    Surveillance. Most recent all clear: 6/'13

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Dice26 View Post
      I just want to throw in an additional thought here. It is true that with more primary survivors, there will be more secondary cancers. Not too many people used to live long enough to get a thirty-five year relapse. However, it's also worth considering where treatments will be in twenty or thirty years. Things have come along way in recent decades. I suspect if this cure buys you another twenty years or so, you'll be in very good hands when the relapse does occur.
      I know I fully intend to die of something more interesting than this stupid TC.
      Indeed, as I said, BEP wasn't even available when I got my first TC. Now, the vast majority of TC patients can expect a full recovery, even after it's started spreading.

      Who knows, 35 years from now they may have a treatment that spares us the need for orchiectomy. Unfortunately, medical research tends to focus on unsolved problems & TC is getting to the point where it is considered "solved" for most cases, so it's unlikely that TC will get the amount of research money to produce the next great breakthrough anytime soon...

      Dave
      Jan, 1975: Right I/O, followed by RPLND
      Dec, 2009: Left I/O, followed by 3xBEP

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Davepet View Post
        Unfortunately, medical research tends to focus on unsolved problems & TC is getting to the point where it is considered "solved" for most cases, so it's unlikely that TC will get the amount of research money to produce the next great breakthrough anytime soon...

        Dave
        Excellent point, and quite true.

        That being said, the harshness of chemo and the potential side effects (both short and long term), as well as the fact that many that die from TC do so from complications related to treatment, means that the journey to a cure should not be over.

        Then if you look at RPLND and how invasive it is, how aggressive chorio is and teratoma being chemo resistant, well it hardly seems that everything is solved. I would also have to say that 95% still means 5% die.

        So, in my mind there is still a long and winding road to travel.
        Best,

        Zsolt


        Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another; "What! You too? I thought I was the only one." - C.S Lewis

        “Experience: that most brutal of teachers. But you learn, my God do you learn.” - C.S. Lewis


        Mass found 11/20/08
        Left I/O 11/25/08
        Pathology: Seminoma, Stage 1
        Surveillance: All Clear since

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Aegean View Post
          Excellent point, and quite true.

          That being said, the harshness of chemo and the potential side effects (both short and long term), as well as the fact that many that die from TC do so from complications related to treatment, means that the journey to a cure should not be over.

          Then if you look at RPLND and how invasive it is, how aggressive chorio is and teratoma being chemo resistant, well it hardly seems that everything is solved. I would also have to say that 95% still means 5% die.

          So, in my mind there is still a long and winding road to travel.
          Compared to almost every other form of cancer, TC is "solved" as far as the medical community is concerned. There will never be a 100% survival rate from any cancer anytime soon, certainly not in the lifetime of anyone already born.
          Money will continue to go to the more common & much less survivable cancers, like pancreatic, lung, breast, ovarian, etc. Research on TC will not be a priority.

          In this article ( http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/djq266v1 ) they say in part:

          The thorough article by Grimison et al. (1), with the careful
          attention to long-term follow-up, in our view, should bring an end
          to clinical investigations of alternatives to BEP × 3 for good-
          prognosis disseminated germ cell tumors.
          Short of a discovery of a
          breakthrough biological concept and therapy, any potential gains
          are too small and potential losses (ie, lives) too great to justify these
          investigations. Dr Lawrence Einhorn called for such clinical trial
          restraint in this arena in 1993 in discussing the comparative trial of
          cisplatin and etoposide to an experimental alternative of carbopla-
          tin and etoposide (10). He closed his editorial entitled “Curable
          neoplasms and the ethics of clinical trials” with “The dictum of
          ‘do no harm’ also applies to regimens that might be inferior to
          standard therapy.”
          The dictum remains relevant.
          I bolded the parts I wanted everyone to notice

          Clearly, we are at a point where further trials, except in cases where BEP has failed, are considered more dangerous than BEP itself is.

          Dave
          Jan, 1975: Right I/O, followed by RPLND
          Dec, 2009: Left I/O, followed by 3xBEP

          Comment


          • #20
            Although at this point there are possibly no clinical trials, there is still extensive research being conducted as can be seen by hundreds of recent research papers being published (ASCO.org). Through observation, further advancement can be made in the understanding and treatment of TC. Not just in reducing the 2% - 5% death rate, but in improving the lives of TC survivors.

            Yes TC is probably the least deadly of all malignant cancer. Yes cancer funds are being directed in more needy areas. But just like the irradiation of smallpox, humankind has a real chance at beating at least 1 type of cancer.

            __________________________________________________ ____
            [insert witticism and/or inspiring comment here]

            Jan 2011 - noticed testicle irregularity (hard + lump)
            Apr 2011 - doctor told me I was over-reacting
            Nov 2011 - doctor finally sent me for ultrasound
            Dec 2011 - R I/O, seminoma, 5cm, rete teste invasion, Stage 1A, clear CT
            Mar 2012 - single dose carboplatin (not yet received)
            Last edited by Mr1Ball; 03-01-12, 09:40 AM. Reason: putting in signature
            _____________________________________________
            [insert witticism and/or inspiring comment here]

            Jan 2011 - noticed testicle irregularity (hard + lump)
            Apr 2011 - doctor told me I was over-reacting
            Nov 2011 - doctor finally sent me for ultrasound
            Dec 2011 - R I/O, seminoma, 5cm, rete teste invasion, Stage 1A, clear CT
            Mar 2012 - single dose carboplatin (not yet received)

            Comment


            • #21
              I was treated (orchiectomy, RPLND, chemo) when I was 4 years old. That was 36 years ago. I have some aches in my back and some fatigue issues, but I'm not going to die young. Especially because I'm over 40 now. But, my skinny old grandpa just hit 101 years old. I see no reason why I can't outlive him. Especially with all the longevity research out there now.

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