Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

A layman's primer on TC chemo

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fed
    started a topic A layman's primer on TC chemo

    A layman's primer on TC chemo

    Over the last several weeks, I have put together a primer on the chemo agents that are used in the treatment of testicular cancer. This primer is aimed at explaining why certain side effects occur while delving a little bit into the biological aspects of their function. In a sense, I want to showcase a little bit of the science while trying to serve as a guide to guys undergoing BEP treatment.

    One of the wonders of the WWW is the ability to edit things promptly. If there are terms that don't make sense, or if you find any errors or confusing terms, let me know so I can look into the issue swiftly.

    Finally, I want to acknowledge the other mods for their help with this. My fellow geek Karen helped bring me down to earth with the jargon, and Scott and Bill made contributions to its readability to the non-scientist.

    The primer can be found here. I hope you find it useful.

  • jdub
    replied
    Any update on this paper? I would like to read it if someone still has it. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • biwi
    replied
    Any word on it being found?

    Leave a comment:


  • CancerSux
    replied
    I'll ask Fed if he still has it.

    T

    Leave a comment:


  • hbr777
    replied
    Originally posted by kaylee View Post
    Hey, did you put this on a new site? I'm trying to access it but the link seems to be broken. Thanks!
    The link is 8 years old. I am not surprised it is gone

    Leave a comment:


  • kaylee
    replied
    link is broken

    Originally posted by Fed View Post
    Over the last several weeks, I have put together a primer on the chemo agents that are used in the treatment of testicular cancer. This primer is aimed at explaining why certain side effects occur while delving a little bit into the biological aspects of their function. In a sense, I want to showcase a little bit of the science while trying to serve as a guide to guys undergoing BEP treatment.

    One of the wonders of the WWW is the ability to edit things promptly. If there are terms that don't make sense, or if you find any errors or confusing terms, let me know so I can look into the issue swiftly.

    Finally, I want to acknowledge the other mods for their help with this. My fellow geek Karen helped bring me down to earth with the jargon, and Scott and Bill made contributions to its readability to the non-scientist.

    The primer can be found here. I hope you find it useful.
    Hey, did you put this on a new site? I'm trying to access it but the link seems to be broken. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • julesTO
    replied
    Thanks Tracy - glad to hear you're all packed up and on the move. I'll look forward to hearing an update. Good luck

    Leave a comment:


  • CancerSux
    replied
    Jules,

    We are on the road to MS right now, but I will send you a PM when we get into Texas tonight at our first stop about it ... IMO, MDs can transition into research pretty well...

    Tracy

    Leave a comment:


  • julesTO
    replied
    Hi Trace & Fed,

    I have a friend who's an MD and is interested in transitioning into a research type roll. Just wondering what paths you took (academic or otherwise) to get into your respective careers? Any thoughts on how a general practitioner could get into your field?

    Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • CancerSux
    replied
    Originally posted by Fed View Post
    Bingo! My lab researches chemical methods of modulating protein-protein interactions, and reactivation of p53 function is the centerpiece of my group's work.
    Nice! That is what I thought by the description.

    My lab focuses on secondary DNA structures induced by supercoiling and using them as druggable targets for oncogenes - mostly for MYC ... kind of pharmacology and chemical (structural really) biology combined.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fed
    replied
    Originally posted by CancerSux View Post
    Fed - do you work on p53? Just reading this 'sticky' thread and saw your reference to controlling apoptosis vs proliferation and thought it sounded like it ...
    Bingo! My lab researches chemical methods of modulating protein-protein interactions, and reactivation of p53 function is the centerpiece of my group's work.

    Leave a comment:


  • CancerSux
    replied
    Originally posted by Fed View Post
    Coincidentally, my research involves finding ways to control this signaling system when it's defective (about 50% of all cancer cells have these problems).
    Fed - do you work on p53? Just reading this 'sticky' thread and saw your reference to controlling apoptosis vs proliferation and thought it sounded like it ...

    Best wishes,
    Tracy

    Leave a comment:


  • Fed
    replied
    Originally posted by starjayroman View Post
    Do you know about the high dose chemos??
    There are two types of HDC regimens. One is carboplatin and etoposide given at 7-10 times the regular doses. The second consist of two phases: an induction with taxol and ifosfamide/mesna followed by consolidation with carboplatin and etoposide given at 4-6 times the regular doses.
    Originally posted by starjayroman View Post
    Like Vinorelbine (Navelbine) and Ifosfamide ?That is what Jay is currently getting along with Cisplatin. Is it the standard VIP for salvage chemo?? He is also getting Mesna and all the counteractive meds they give him.
    Typically, salvage regimens use vinblastine, ifosfamide and platinum (VeIP) or taxol, ifosfamide and platinum (TIP). VIP is now considered a first-line treatment for patients that could show toxicity to bleomycin.
    Originally posted by starjayroman View Post
    I am worried about what might happen when he is home alone with our son during Nadir and I am at work. I am already making sure that Chris knows to dial 911 and give our address. I am also trying to find a place to learn CPR. I also need to find a support group for our son that has kids going through similar things. He couldn't sleep last night worrying about dad.
    Great call on giving instructions to your son. The burden cancer has on kids of patients is evident at all ages, and that is a difficult struggle. Perhaps your local cancer center has information on support groups for kids (I know we have them at Dana-Farber).

    Leave a comment:


  • starjayroman
    replied
    Fed,
    Do you know about the high dose chemos?? Like Vinorelbine (Navelbine) and Ifosfamide ?That is what Jay is currently getting along with Cisplatin. Is it the standard VIP for salvage chemo?? He is also getting Mesna and all the counteractive meds they give him. Because of one of the drugs he is getting shots of insulin. He has three today. I am worried about what might happen when he is home alone with our son during Nadir and I am at work. I am already making sure that Chris knows to dial 911 and give our address. I am also trying to find a place to learn CPR. I also need to find a support group for our son that has kids going through similar things. He couldn't sleep last night worrying about dad.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fed
    replied
    Originally posted by John S
    Does the XRT and carboplatinum also work by disrupting the DNA?
    Carboplatin works exactly like cisplatin, the difference being that carboplatin binds to DNA a bit more weakly than cisplatin. Because of the weaker binding, carboplatin is not as potent as cisplatin, but as a consequence, it produces fewer side effects, a trait that makes it attractive for use in high dose regimens.

    XRT causes damage to DNA, especially when cells are dividing. All cells have a signaling system that detects damage to DNA and instructs the cell to fix it. If the damage is too overwhelming, the same signaling system instructs the cell to self-destruct. Coincidentally, my research involves finding ways to control this signaling system when it's defective (about 50% of all cancer cells have these problems).

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X